Beautiful reads for kids – Storytime magazine

I love a good print subscription. We have a few for the kids and they get such a rush opening the post and looking through new magazines when they arrive. Magazines often throw things up for us to explore further or new activities to try. In the past, we’ve mostly done science and nature ones but every now and then I’d eye up a fiction magazine. I finally got my chance to get a closer look when Storytime asked if we’d like to review their magazine.

The illustrations are fresh, colourful and quirky, in the style of modern storybooks. The pages are of a heavier paper stock, not card but not flimsy. These are magazines made for collecting. We certainly won’t be throwing them away.

The content is pretty timeless. My eye was drawn to this poem by Robert Louis Stevenson, made more accessible for my kids by the illustrator’s keen sensibility. Talitha went ahead and read both issues we were sent but when I read them to her afterwards, we talked about the art of reading poetry, that it’s often transformed by reading aloud. Ophelia was taken by Gabriel Setoun’s “Jack Frost” poem, following the many pictures he paints on the windows at night, verse by verse.

The magazine brings together classic and original tales, myths and legends from around the world, fairy tales and rhymes. They are carefully curated, the tales thrilling and the standard high. My older two, at three and six are delighted with it but I imagine they would have been a good fit for me at ten or even older too.

Along with a fact or a themed activity to accompany each story, there’s a “storytime playbox” at the back with word searches, brainteasers, prompts for drawing, crafts, recipes – all offering a chance to take the stories further. There’s even a game to play. Springing you further into reading, each issue concludes with book recommendations for children too.

Storytime has clearly been carefully conceived and it’s certainly beautifully executed. We’ve had ours for a few weeks now and they’ve gone most places with us. Ophelia has her clear favourites that’s she’s asked me to read over and over. Talitha has so many questions about things we come across in there. I love that there are no adverts and that it raises discussions about geography, different cultures and the natural world. They just love getting lost in beautiful stories.

Storytime sent us two issues for review and have also given us a year’s subscription in exchange for this post. All gushing is entirely honest, though. I absolutely love this magazine and what they stand for as a social enterprise, working with schools, charities and councils to make high quality reading materials available at a low price.

You can also grab a 10% discount on your subscription here. Storytime even sends out educational resources to go alongside each month’s issue!


Our homeschooling month – September

September brought with it that predictable back-to-school feeling, even though we don’t particularly pay school terms much mind. Learning is woven into our living. A book is read while a baby is fed, French phrases are practised conversationally over meals, giving and spending pocket money sparks addition, subtraction and multiplication. We don’t do school at home.

Yet after a summer of disruption, with visitors coming through and home ed groups pausing, we’ve been craving routine again. The weeks are gradually taking a recognisable shape as we refine where to go and what to commit to.

We’re probably doing more groups than we need to but I feel like though we’ve made some great connections, we’re still building our community and it’s worth keeping the net wide, staying open to meeting new people and going deeper with those we’ve already connected with.

Talitha spent the summer counting down to Beavers starting again. She’s now invested which was a big deal for her. She’s also started violin lessons, practising every day. Ophelia started a fun dance class, something she’d set her heart on. She was so excited she wouldn’t even let us stay with her for the trial lesson.

We’re following Story of the World, an engaging read aloud history curriculum, supplementing with Usborne books, online videos and the accompanying activity book. Talitha also went to a history workshop at the local museum which will be running monthly and tying in with what we’re reading about. This time she learned about the Stone, Bronze and Iron Age, handled models of artefacts, ground wheat and made a clay pot.

For the last couple of years we’ve dipped in and out of Exploring Nature with Children, a Charlotte Mason inspired curriculum that weaves together science, art, literature and nature study. We’ve started keeping to it a bit more now that local friends are following it too. This month we covered seeds, mini beasts, the Autumn equinox and Autumn leaves.

Our read alouds have included finishing off Moominpapa by the Sea, flying through Milly Molly Mandy and digging into Heidi. Talitha read an adaptation of the last and asked if we could read the real thing. When we got started I worried that it would be too dense but she’s truly enjoying it, hungry for the next chapter and talking about it later in the day. Ophelia’s read alouds are Winnie the Pooh and Frog and Toad. She’s a bit obsessed with the latter! Both have fallen in love with the stories, illustrations and poems in Storytime magazine. Come back tomorrow for a review of it here on the blog. (Edited to add: you can read my review of Storytime here).

Maths, reading and writing naturally come up in our day to day lives whether in games, cooking, list making, letter writing or imaginative play. However, we’ve continued to enjoy Life of Fred, which explores maths concepts through funny stories. I’ll order the next book soon. Our Spielgaben set has seen some building and small world play but we’re finding it chaotic to get small parts out with a whirlwind toddler who wants to get into whatever her big sisters are doing. The older two have continued to enjoy Reading Eggs and Mathseeds. Talitha often pulls workbooks off the shelf for down time or disappears to curl up somewhere with a book. She’s reading Little House on the Prairie at the moment, which we’ll also read aloud soon.

The older two seem to have found a good flow of doing things independently and together now that Ophelia is happy to entertain herself with dress ups, duplo or the play kitchen and will seek out Delilah or me when her big sister doesn’t feel like playing. They also play well together and though they do fight, I’m grateful for all the time they get together. They’re also building on friendships outside the home and it’s exciting seeing Ophelia start to forge her own as she gets older.

Their big interest at the moment is ocean animals – unsurprising when you go to the beach every week. Serendipitously, this is also the theme one of the home ed groups we go to has been working on. Last week they did mammals and we visited the seal sanctuary as a little family field trip. As another happy coincidence, our first two issues of science magazine Whizz Pop Bang have covered seeds and the ocean, nicely tying in with stuff we’ve been exploring and helping them take it further. The kids have also been looking at ocean videos on The Kids Should See This and borrowed lots of ocean books from the library.

It’s impossible to pin down everything they’ve been working on. I find Talitha’s crafty creations and Ophelia’s many knots tied everywhere. Ophelia is working at writing her name. Talitha is teaching herself cursive. Delilah has worked out how to climb up slides (not ladders).

I oscillate between loving this life we have together and wanting to escape it, mainly because I worry that I’m not good at it. I am too often controlling and am working at letting go, apologising to my children and forgiving myself so I can change. I worry that we do too much. I worry that we don’t do enough. I worry that I don’t know how to just be with my children. I need to see other adults. I need to stay home and recover from putting myself out there. My kids need time and space to rest, process and create. They need to be out seeing other children and trying new things. Balance is a rare find. Yet moving into October, it feels like everything is slowly settling.


How do we smash gender stereotypes for our girl family?

“Three girls! Poor dad!” Thanks, you’ve just told my children their dad wishes at least one of them were a boy. He doesn’t.
“You have your hands full. Are they all…?” My eldest has started answering this one, “Yes, we’re all girls.”
“Are you going to keep trying for a boy?” I guess the assumption here is that that’s what we were doing the second or third time. I’m always tempted to respond asking for advice on how to do that. I mean, is there a specific position for conceiving boys?

Truly, I know that this is meant as friendly conversation. I almost said “polite” but it isn’t that. Certainly not to my children. It’s the usual everyday childism that casually ignores children’s feelings while speaking about them, in front of them. It’s not unique to being “a girl family” as Talitha has dubbed us. Mothers of boys are familiar with it too.

But yes, it is meant to be friendly. So I respond with this in mind, telling my daughters when the stranger has passed that people are just surprised we have so many girls in our family.

Then I wonder how to inoculate them against the underpinning message that their gender is their most defining characteristic since it’s so often the first or only thing people choose to comment on.

By aggressively gendering children, we’ve created a society where we pay lip service to the idea that children can be anything they want to be while showing them something quite different. By and large, boys are expected to be tough, adventurous, capable and boisterous whereas girls are expected to be emotive, cautious, sociable and gentle. None of these characteristics are innately problematic. However, they’re also not innately gendered.

BBC Two recently aired the documentary “No More Boys and Girls: Can Our Kids Go Gender Free?” which convincingly ties the way we treat our children to the gender inequality they experience as adults. The show continually returns to brain scans of boys and girls which debunk the myth that we are neurologically different. Gender is socially constructed. It’s a good starting point if you’ve not given the issue much thought before. And it’s still interesting if it’s long been a concern.

As a parent of a six year old, I was shocked at the gendered views the programme’s seven year olds held about men and women, the opposite sex and themselves. Perhaps home educating has sheltered us from some of the gender stereotyping pervasive in institutions?

Our children see Laurence as involved in caring for the home as I am. He is as likely to change a nappy as I am when he’s around. They may have “girly” toys but most of their toys are gender neutral or even toys stereotypically considered “for boys”. Their dressing up box houses princess dresses alongside costumes for a builder, doctor, police officer and pirate amongst others. We aren’t precious about their clothes and spend most of our time outdoors, giving them lots of opportunity to get messy and encouraging them to take risks.

Yet we have still imparted clear, at times unhelpful, ideas of what it means to be a man or a woman. In their minds, fathers go out to work and mothers stay at home to look after the children or at least work part time or from home. We try to communicate that this is a choice we’ve taken together for this period of family life but that it isn’t the way everyone does it.

Actually, we don’t consider it ideal ourselves. Laurence wants more time with the children. I’m hungry for more time to work as our kids get older. While a major life change where we both work and care for the children part time isn’t possible in the immediate future, we want to work at striking more of a balance in the present and to think about how we could change things more radically in the years to come.

I’ve also felt challenged recently to counter my learned helplessness. From hanging picture frames to mowing the lawn to figuring out what’s up with the dishwasher, I routinely leave DIY and maintenance jobs to Laurence. He is better at them (more practice, perhaps?) but what does my constant refrain “We’ll ask Daddy to do that later” say to our girls.

I hope that his involving them in these tasks helps to undo the effect of my shying away from attempting them. Talitha wielded a power drill to put our furniture together when we moved in. I’m not sure I’ve ever touched one. She knows how to put our tent up though I still don’t. They both love helping him build fires. But when things go wrong, they’re still quick to say, “Don’t worry. Daddy will do that.” My words in their mouths.

So I’m taking little steps. I learned to light the wood burner when we moved in. We take turns driving when going somewhere. This weekend I rowed our dinghy to the boat for the first time. I was terrible at it but I hope that they’ll see something in me working at difficult jobs rather than always leaving them to the person who’s more practised. I bought a wetsuit so that I can be the one to take them into the sea instead of making that a daddy thing.

We’ve been questioning what we’d do differently if they were boys. Would we be more inclined to take them out with a ball? Would Laurence involve them more in looking at rugby and cricket? Would we have the same standards in terms of grooming and manners? Would we value the same things? Would we talk to them the same way or talk about the same things? The conversation is ongoing.

From the positive pregnancy test, we start imagining the new baby, their gender a part of that. We’ve opted each time to know the sex at the twenty week scan. We even did a “gender reveal” video with Delilah (total heart melt looking back at that – how little they were!).

Yet, throughout my pregnancy with her, I felt uncomfortable about how important we made the fact that she was a girl. It doesn’t decide who she’s going to be. Being a “girl family” doesn’t decide who any of them are going to be.


Planning ahead for a greener Christmas

This post is brought to you by UncommonGoods. It’s something that’s genuinely been on my mind and I hope we can share some ideas around it.

I know, I know! How can I breathe the word “Christmas” when it’s only August? The thing is, I’ve finally accepted that if I don’t plan ahead for Christmas I end up not just spending more money than I would otherwise but not necessarily making the most ethical choices with my spending either. I reckon planning well in advance makes for a greener Christmas overall so this is what I’m kick starting now, a few months in advance.

Making presents
Every year I say I want to make some decent presents for our family but I wind up leaving it too late! Now’s the time to get the sewing machine and crochet needle going. I’ve started collecting ideas but if it gets to November and I’ve not begun, it won’t happen.

Delegating
Cutting down the cost of Christmas spending goes hand in hand with trying to make more eco friendly and ethical choices because when money gets super tight, we wind up having to go with whatever option’s cheapest, it’s just a reality. So one way we’re getting around that is asking people we’re spending Christmas with to share responsibility by bringing dishes with them.

Spreading the cost of ethical purchases

In the vein of the above, we need to budget well to ensure we buy things we believe in. That may well mean buying some of it now and considering retailers like UncommonGoods, which are committed to sustainability and social responsibility. UncommonGoods features recycled, handmade and organic products and even donates a percentage of its proceeds to non-profit organisations. From quirky gifts such as an upcycled sari robe or a set of tea from around the world to gadgets gifts like wooden brain teasers to gifts for wine connoisseurs like birthstone bottle stoppers, they boast a genuinely intriguing collection.


Contemplating traditions

I’ve started evaluating the traditions we’ve picked up over our last six Christmases with kids and though it’s definitely still a work in progress, I’m fairly certain we’ve been wasting money on stuff they and we really don’t need. I want us to focus on traditions that don’t involve spending or acquiring, like putting together activities to take us through the Advent Calendar or making a Jesse Tree.

Making wrapping “paper”
My mother-in-law has been sewing cloth gift wraps for this year’s birthday presents and though I’m not committed to this as another item on our to-do list, it’s really given us something to think about. Most wrapping paper is not recyclable and we get through so much of it, it can be a real problem. Even if we just potato print or hand print recyclable paper, we’ll want to get an early start and that means scheduling it in at some point, thinking now for the Autumn.

Sourcing the Christmas tree
Every year we are pretty last minute on our tree and don’t give it much thought but this year I’d really like to try to change that whether it means picking up a tree a school is throwing out, buying from a member of the British Tree Growth Association or looking for a tree that can be replanted. The thing is, it bears thinking about ahead of time, even if we’re just telling the kids not to expect the tree as early as we often get it because we’re waiting for a “used” one.

Collect ideas and junk for decorations
I love making decorations with the kids and this year I’d like to rescue more from the recycling for our decorations. We’ve used an old hanger to make a wreath in the past but I have my sights set on a cardboard gingerbread house this year. Hopefully they go for it and don’t insist on the sweets. Maybe we’ll do both if they do.


Still pretty proud of these stockings I made for the girls with Laurence’s old jumpers. I’ve another jumper ready to become one for Delilah

Over to you. Anything you’re planning to do differently this year? I can’t be the only one thinking of Christmas already, surely.


How our third baby changed the way we home educate

Talitha takes books out into the garden on a sunny day. She’s reading about famous artists here.

When I was pregnant with Delilah, I fielded a lot of questions about how I’d cope with home educating then five year old Talitha when she was born. It’s amusing that they considered the new baby more disruptive to our set up than my wildly busy then two year old! How I’d respond depended on how well I knew the person asking and whether I felt energetic enough to explain that we weren’t in fact doing “school at home”, as they probably imagined. People asked out of interest and, to be honest, I also wondered how I’d cope, not just with homeschooling but with three children, in general.

Delilah turned one last week, neatly coinciding with the end of the school year. While we don’t really observe term dates, I took it as a marker of the time we’ve survived and in which we’ve even thrived. Looking back on this crazy year, my approach to home education has developed and changed in ways I couldn’t have expected.

I started the year holding tightly to the idea of structure. I had lists and plans, things I put together mostly with the children and while I never forced Talitha to do anything, I was very much the driving force in getting them done. I strongly encouraged her to do the things I thought she should be doing and found it difficult to let go emotionally when this inevitably became a battle of wills. It was frustrating for both of us.

A friend had suggested that in the new baby haze, I might want to consider unschooling, following the child’s lead and allowing her to learn through living, rather than keeping any rigid plans. Since my plans were pretty relaxed, I felt we could keep to a discernible schedule regardless and so I didn’t take the advice much to heart.

But. I’d forgot what having a newborn was like. I’d forgot what having a newborn who woke a lot in the night was like. I’d forgot what juggling the needs of a newborn and a two and a half year old was like, never mind throwing in the five year old who, though independent and rather helpful, still had needs too.

And I didn’t factor in that our lives would be majorly disrupted by Laurence staying over in Cornwall for part of every week or by going back and forth to Cornwall to house hunt or by the trip to Thailand. And I certainly could not have appreciated how thrown we would be, picking up our lives and moving from one part of the country to another.

A lot more than “just” a new baby made this a chaotic year. I think that’s why I clung for control. I felt so overwhelmed.

I began to be at war with myself, feeling we needed to keep to this arbitrary schedule and beating myself up because I couldn’t make it work for us. And I really wasn’t even attempting to sit us around a table with workbooks and a white board, honest.

Finally, I began to face up to the fact that I needed to work with things as they were and learn to live well in the present rather than daydream about what I’d do when we weren’t working around naps or when I had more sleep or when my three year old was more independent or even when my baby was a three year old (talk about wishing your life away!).

I totally appreciate that for some people, coping with disruption means holding onto more routine but for me, I needed to think smaller than that and seek to change myself rather than impose my will on my family – something I hadn’t even realised I was doing.

So, I got down to basics. What was really important in a day? What was the minimum I could leave on that list of things to do. Just as when Talitha was a baby I had to learn that there were seasons where I’d only get one or two household tasks done, I needed to pare the home education to-do list back too.

I arrived at “read books to them” and “get outdoors”. That’s all I was aiming to offer in a day. Anything else was an extra and the girls could autonomously find plenty to fill their time. Sometimes time outdoors would just mean a picnic in our garden, others it would be running about on a rainy winter beach. Sometimes it didn’t happen at all. I had to learn to be at peace with that too.


Above, Talitha decided to fill a calendar with important dates and both were using prompt cards to write and draw in their journals

I channelled my limited energy into making the various spaces we’ve been in as accessible as possible so the kids can create, explore and play without needing too much input from me when I might be stuck under a baby. I still view this as my primary responsibility in home educating – creating an environment that is child friendly and not overwhelming.

As the year went on, I began to relax more and more because I could see that they really were learning. After a couple of months of refusing to read aloud, Talitha was suddenly absorbed in chapter books, understanding what she was reading. She even started reading aloud again with a fluency that no one trained her into. Ophelia’s numeracy and dexterity took huge leaps. Both love books, are full of questions and are always making or experimenting. We haven’t done much crafting together this year but I’m often finding their creations, surprised by the thought that’s gone into it and what it says about what they’ve been exploring.

I began to appreciate learning where it was happening. Talitha might write a letter to a friend or a to-do list or invitations to her teddies, inviting them to a party. They might count for fun or try to logically work something out or play games and put together puzzles. Sometimes they get workbooks out for fun. Every day they’re making connections between experiences and conversations, things we’ve read or seen in a video and answers they’ve been collecting along the way.

Out of curiosity, I had a look at the national curriculum for Year One. Many things we’ve covered by accident or Talitha’s discovered through things she’s doing anyway. Other things I figure she’ll get to when and if she needs them. We’ve delved into yet others that aren’t on the curriculum, mostly guided by their interests though I do also throw things in the way.


Baking is so often a great basis for both learning and reconnecting

I’m not totally sure what this means for the year ahead. I suspect we will, bit by bit, bring in a little more gentle routine to make sure we’re making the time for the things everybody wants to do. But I’m more aware of the need to keep taking the temperature of our family and working out where we’re at.

I am so grateful to have home educated this year. I’m relieved not to have had to do the school run with a baby and with a preschooler who has her own ideas about transitions. I also love that the girls have all had masses of time together. The older two gain a lot from being around a baby and learning that we slow down and adapt in times of great change.

Check out what we get up to day-to-day over on Instagram, especially in my stories.


Ten things to consider when camping with younger children

We finally managed our first camping trip as a family of five. We were meant to go to a festival when Delilah was six weeks old but Laurence got ill and that just proved one obstacle too many. Then our first trip this year got turned into a picnic since the forecast for the rest of the weekend was dire. So the older girls were desperate for a night under canvas. A couple of weeks ago, we made it to Bude. I’d booked a cute little eco campsite and we were keen to try out a different part of Cornwall.

Talitha was almost three when we first took her camping. It’s since become a mainstay of our family spring, summer and even autumn now. We’ve gone camping with a younger baby as well as while I was pregnant. Our kids are now 6 years old, 3 years old and 11 months old and having done a recent camp, I’ve collated a few things to consider when camping with younger children, should you decide to go for it this year.

A change is as good as a rest
Let’s face it, there are a lot of things about family camping that are not restful. I don’t know whether we’ll ever reach a point where getting ready to go for a weekend doesn’t feel like a total mission.

I also find sleeping with a baby in a tent a bit of a tricky one because I tend to get stuck in one position then need to shift her to the other side of me so I can get into another one. The logistics are trickier dealing with layers and sleeping bags. It’s totally doable but it probably explains the massive bags under my eyes in the YouTube video at the end of this post.

Still, we find as the kids get older that the change of place and pace offers us adults some decent chill time. Even their just running around the field on this last trip, darting in and out of the tent and pretending the sleeping bags were the ocean allowed us time to sit, chat and even read. Better yet if you get to sit somewhere with a view. And there are so many little things that are suddenly less work more play when camping like cooking over a fire or the kids washing the dishes in a tub on the ground.

So while we may not have come home having had a lot of sleep, and we may well have brought more work home in the form of laundry and unpacking, we were refreshed in other ways. I can only see this becoming more fun as we go along, especially as the kids become more and more free range.

Get and stay prepared

Make the idea of going less daunting by working with a camping list and keeping some of the stuff in a ready-to-grab box if you can.

The right kit can make all the difference
Just as there’s no such thing as bad weather only improper clothing, the kit makes a serious difference when camping too. It was a real game changer buying a tent that we could reasonably stand up in and compartmentalise our stuff around.

More recently, Millets sent us four sleeping bags, an overdue upgrade. The girls are lounging about in a couple of them in the photos above. We went for two VANGO Harmony single sleeping bags thinking that they would be spacious enough for Delilah to cosleep with me, which they just about are. We also asked for two VANGO Nitestar 250 sleeping bags because they’re more performance bags which we thought would grow with the girls as they take on their own outdoor pursuits in the future. Both bags are soft, breathable and a great temperature for spring and summer camping, certainly. The harmony feels a bit luxurious even. We’re looking forward to taking them on the boat for our first overnight stay this weekend.

Millets also sent us a fun camping care package as part of their #homefromhome campaign with everything from mobile phone charger to lantern to waterproofing spray to tent repair kit to cup holder. Some things we either hadn’t known they carried or hadn’t known were a thing! They may not have all been bare bones essentials but a few extras can take little stresses you weren’t aware were there out of the picture. It gave a glimpse of the broad scope of their camping range.

Throw out the routine
Every time we go camping we get into a debate about whether we should be encouraging bedtime or let the kids take the lead. Laurence is always for the latter and always proven right about it too. With the excitement, noise and light, the kids are never ready to go to bed at the normal time, however worried I might be about how tired they’ll be the next day, as they don’t lie in either.

And yes, they’re more tired, but it all tends to work itself out in the end, either by them taking themselves off to bed a little earlier the following night, opting for an afternoon nap or, hey, just being a bit tired, which isn’t the end of the world after all. I reckon late nights and all sharing the sleep space are key parts of the memories we’re making.

Let camping be the main event
I made a bit of a mistake with this latest trip by choosing to camp in Bude, an hour and a half away from where we live near Falmouth. It meant that I felt like I had to justify the journey by planning to see things. As it turned out, we would have all preferred to have just hung out around the campground, maybe venturing out on just one day, rather than both. As usual, slow and simple makes for a happier time with younger kids.

Take a few activities
In times past, we’ve just brought a few books and bubbles and called that that but a year on, I think we need to add to a few things to the list. Certainly if we were going any longer we might bring sketchbooks and pencils, a card game, a chapter book for Talitha, water pistols and maybe something active like a bat and ball.

Choose the right spot
OK so maybe Bude was a bit further than we needed to go, since we live in Cornwall and are surrounding by great outdoor spaces but I couldn’t recommend Cerenety eco campsite enough. The facilities were perfectly comfortable. The compost loos were extremely well kept, there were hot solar showers and we were encouraged to build fires.

They run a quirky caravan cafe, offering coffee and crepes for breakfast and take children around to see and feed their rescue animals mid-morning. The alpacas left a lasting impression on Talitha and Ophelia. There’s even a pond and a permaculture forest garden. The site is conveniently located for Bude but far enough away to feel a bit wild.

A big highlight was going over to Crackington Haven, pictured below. It is such a lovely little beach, perfect for chilling on while the kids play, build and paddle and there was an amazing surfer making good use of the waves too.

Less might well be more
I used to want to pack our entire house, feeling that the kids needed so many clothes, especially jumpers but they run wild, don’t care about the wet or cold and won’t let me dress them. Even when I pack what I think is too little, we never use it all!

Let your children rewild you
Camping used to reside firmly in the category of things I did for Laurence or the kids. I’ve often forced myself to be more outdoorsy or adventurous than I’d be inclined to be on my own.

Bit by bit, I feel things changing inside me. I get braver, more willing to try things, to trust myself, to stop worrying, to let go, to have fun.

I probably still wouldn’t go camping if it weren’t for my children but every time we go, I find I’m doing it a little more for me too. This time, I felt I could have stayed days beyond a weekend, even with the rain.

Capture the moment
There’s a fine line between missing the moment and gently documenting our experiences. I don’t always get it right. I try to take a few snaps and clips on my phone unobtrusively and hope I’m not distracting anyone, including myself. In future, it would be great to add sketching or even flower pressing to the mix. I’d love for the girls to look back and smile at the memories. They loved this video we made of our first camping trip with three children. Do take a look.



Thanks to Millets for the sleeping bags and camping care package


Win a family ticket to Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom live on stage

With all the craziness of moving from Bristol to Cornwall earlier this year, I told the girls that we’d do birthday parties next year. We had grandparents come over for Ophelia’s and they’ll come again for Talitha’s but that’s about the height of excitement and organisation I was and am up to.

But with little Delilah’s first birthday looming in just two months, I still wanted to plan something special. Of course, she’s not going to know what’s going on but first birthdays are fun landmarks for the rest of the family so I thought that making it a treat for the older two as much as for her could be the way to go.

After all, they’re excited about every little thing she does, whether it’s learning to turn very slightly as she begins to bum shuffle or making a new sound. They’ll definitely make a fuss over her turning one. Isn’t that a brilliant thing about subsequent babies? This time around you have at least one person who’s as excited or more about every little detail as you are!

As it turns out, it’ll be baby’s first theatre show, a trip to the Hall for Cornwall in Truro to see Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom live on stage.

The older two were ecstatic when I shared the news, planning already how it was going to go and insisting, of course, that we watch a few episodes in preparation. They love Ben & Holly, love the theatre and love birthdays so it has the makings of the best family outing in their view. We took Talitha to her first play when she was a tiny toddler and Ophelia has been going to the theatre since she was a babe in arms.

We’ve never been to see a cartoon favourite taken to the stage, though, so this will be a fun first. With masks and music, the show promises to offer a gentle, colourful and interactive theatre experience, perfect for young fans of the BAFTA-winning show, especially those in need of a theatre introduction. Take a look at the trailer…

It’s currently on tour visiting theatres throughout the UK and Ireland, and probably near you, should your kids love the little fairy and elf too. You can check out dates and more information on the show over on the Ben and Holly live show website.

The show is offering readers of Beautiful Tribe the chance to win a family ticket (2 adults and 2 children) for any show on the tour. To enter to win, leave a comment on this post answering the question the following question:

Q. What is the name of the ladybird in Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom?
George, Gary or Gaston?

Good luck!

The prize will be fulfilled by Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom live on stage. Entries close on June 6th at 10pm. Winner will be chosen at random by number generator.

We have been given tickets to the show in exchange for hosting this giveaway.

THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED